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>> 16 November 2009 - 18:24 GMT

Assassin's Creed II - Xbox 360 vs PlayStation 3 comparison

Six of one...

There aren’t many multi-format releases left this year, but Assassin’s Creed 2 is one of the big ones.

The following shots are taken from the early segment of the PS3 and 360 versions. We’ve tried our best to avoid spoilers.

Both the cut scenes and the in-game shots show that there are some potentially significant differences between the two versions.

Firstly, the PS3 version has what seems to be superior lighting. This is demonstrated by those shots set at night, or in otherwise dark surroundings. Light sources – such as the light hanging in front of the house at the top of this shot, or this grab, taken during your character’s birth – do a much better job of illuminating those objects around them than in the 360 version.

We know what you're thinking - that our settings are off. But not so - both our 360 and PS3 are running at their best. We also wondered whether or not the PS3's lighting is more apparent because the PS3 version is brighter (and more washed out) overall? Again, no. Lowering the brightness of the PS3 grabs or upping the 360 shots fails to replicate the PS3's lighting levels. It’s clear that the 360 lighting just isn’t as powerful as its PS3 equivalent – suggesting this is done differently in the two versions.

Peering over to the other side of the fence, however, will reveal far superior texture definition and detail levels in the 360 version. Using the above-the-courtyard shot again, you can see this demonstrated by the hay in the wagon and the leaves on the balcony to the cart’s left, which are much clearer. While in this shot, the building textures are much more detailed.

Naturally this does come at a sort of price, in the sense that the 360's extra detail levels makes the aliasing more noticable, whereas the PS3's softer and more washed out appearance hides the jaggies to some degree. Nevertheless, we found the clearer textures in the 360 game to be preferable to the better lit, but slightly washed out, PS3 game.

But don’t take our word for it. There are loads more direct comparison shots below, and the comments section to tell us why we’re wrong. Tenner says the PS3 fans shout the loudest ;).

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USER COMMENTS

There are 8 comments for this article.
tommy-gun
Joined: 28 September 2009
Posts: 3
Posted: 17 November 2009 @ 09:37 GMT
According to LOT texture quality is the same: "Visually, both versions of Assassin’s Creed II look virtually identical. Textures, shadows and anti-aliasing quality match very well."

According to LOT texture quality is the same: "Visually, both versions of Assassin’s Creed II look virtually identical. Textures, shadows and anti-aliasing quality match very well."

Diffrences comes from techniques of anti aliasing used in both version, xbox use MSAAx2 and PS3 use QAAx2. Adventage of QAAx2 is that it smooth edges like MSAAx4, disadvantage is that it wash out every texture a little bit, that's why some of them look more detailed on 360, but resolution is the same.

PS3 version render much more light sources, for me it's a win for PS3.

Sorry for (sometimes very) bad english ;)
CyberRazorCut
Joined: 10 September 2009
Posts: 50
Posted: 17 November 2009 @ 09:43 GMT
I suppose that makes sense - that texture quality beneath AA is the same. However, you only have to look at the shots above to see that for all intents and purposes, the PS3's texture's DO suffer on output, even if they are fundamentally the same.

So for me, based on the above shots, the 360 looks nicer on output. Simple as that.
MoI96
Joined: 17 November 2009
Posts: 1
Posted: 17 November 2009 @ 23:05 GMT
Well, of my pr0ness with the PS3 I can say this:
Its kinda... fake. This is why:
If you put on display settings on PS3, "RGB Range" or something like that, to "Full", it will be better than xbox.
It takes out the light, and adds great textures. I tried, and it gets so much better then xbox.
GameswireBot
Joined: 6 February 2009
Posts: 27
Posted: 17 November 2009 @ 23:37 GMT
Our PS3 RGB setting is on 'full'.

Our 360 setting is on 'expanded'.

So both are running at optimum.

Any differences are a result of the game.
PlayerBG
Joined: 18 October 2009
Posts: 11
Posted: 17 November 2009 @ 23:46 GMT
Yes,the 360 version looks a bit sharper.
Why don`t you guys make an "AC1 vs AC2" comparison,it would be interesting...
cmdrdredd
Joined: 30 November 2009
Posts: 2
Posted: 30 November 2009 @ 00:14 GMT
The problem is on PS3 using RGB Full is the 100% incorrect way to output. You want to use the other option and not RGB at all and turn super white on. Also, If you notice the 360 textures look sharper but also more unnatural and with a lot of red. It even has black crush which is why you think it looks better in the first place. The PS3 is outputting a more neutral black and not crushing it.
cmdrdredd
Joined: 30 November 2009
Posts: 2
Posted: 30 November 2009 @ 00:15 GMT
I forgot to say, take a stroll over to AVS forum and learn why using RGB mode on a PS3 via HDMI is incorrect and what superwhite mode does.
GameswireBot
Joined: 6 February 2009
Posts: 27
Posted: 1 December 2009 @ 20:30 GMT
"The problem is on PS3 using RGB Full is the 100% incorrect way to output."

Nope.
ergergerg
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